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2012.03.07
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1. A life never experienced before

This article is the last one of my series “Evacuation Life.” How long the life at the evacuation life will last? I do not know how long: may be one year, may be two years. The people at the camp will move to temporary houses, rent houses or may buy their own houses.
People will leave the Big Palette, and two camps may be merged to smaller scales. The life at the camps is gradually improving day by day. After almost two months in evacuation, people here are prepared for
spending the days to come here. My diary sketches an evacuation life never experienced before.
It is a record of the people who were made to evacuate due to nuclear accidents. The life is different from the evacuation life due to natural disasters, almost no prior experience in Japan. The difference is that: (1) the people were instructed to evacuate all of a sudden on one day, although the house was not destroyed, was not flown away due to tsunami and no casualties; and (2) the people are forced to stay 100km away for an indefinite period. Their stresses are further intensified when the news is reported on the people in the earthquake and/or tsunami hit areas, who are working to restore their hometowns and industries.
A closest example of our environment may be a gorilla in a zoo
cage, which was brought there far from Africa. My interest in the evacuation life is shifting to the analyses of the meaning of the accidents; What should the nuclear stakeholders and the people interested in the nuclear future learn from the accidents and think about will be addressed in my separate paper in the near future.

Thank you for your interest in my record of experience in the evacuation camp.The evacuation will continue till… When? I don’t know yet. I do hope no more experience will be made by anybody else in Japan and worldwide. “No nuclear accidents” is the only solution to make this happen.
My thanks go to all my JAIF colleagues, as equally to volunteers at the camp, who helped my evacuation life, and especially to Toshio Konishi, who translated my record into English. I hope every person, who read this article, will get lessons from it and learn by himself/herself
for peaceful future.






Last updated  2012.03.07 12:03:53
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1. Working spirits being lost: A concern of my friend, a shopkeeper

He has lived half a month in a resort area in Fukushima Prefecture. He is awarded with an accommodation and two meals per day up to US$50. The
prefecture bears the cost. The scenery around is marvelous, two meals are not bad.
Although the lunch costs something, but not much, nothing special to do day after day, TV programs are not effective in killing time. Visited a couple of nearby vista points, but no more places to visit …
His job was nothing to do with the NPP. He lost his shop and all customers. He used to get some jobs anyway, although some ups and downs depending on the economy. In low economy, he could find jobs unless he made no selections, while in high economy he could choose what he had wanted to do. But now, living in an unfamiliar location, in a resort area with few people around, he can’t find energy to work.
He is not forced to work for living. He can survive for at least three months with no incomes. There is no possibility to return home for months, probably more than one year. Even if he can, there are no certainties at all to go back to his former jobs. Nothing promising to terminate the accidents is foreseen.
After three months of this resort life, some other means will take effect for evacuation. Thus, he can spend a year or even longer without doing anything productive. He may lose the energy to work. He is concerned about it.

2. Renting of an own apartment was a mistake?

A couple of measures have been taken for accommodation by the prefectural headquarters; rent houses, temporary houses (equipped with a sets of five pieces of electric appliance donated by the Red Cross), or three-month secondary evacuation to hotels or ryokan. The people in the
Big Palette have applied for all of them. Unfortunately, no measures seem to work in a big scale.
All these measures have conditions for selection: a higher priority to a family having an aged member over 75 years old, a pregnant lady or an infant, a very sick member, a member in need of caretaking, or more than three children between 3 and 15 years old, etc.
The result so far is zero temporary houses, and less than 1,000 people who moved to rent-houses or hotels. Some bigger spaces are being given these days to the families in the Big Palette. This is not because the
number of people decreased, but because another big room in the Annex was opened as the evacuation space.
A new rule was recently announced: up to US$600 can be awarded per month to the families who rent a house by themselves. Everybody thought they could find their favorite houses to rent. But the reality is the same conditions above are applied. I wonder how many families can use
this new system.
The population of Tomioka-cho and Okuma-cho together is about 20,000. People in the evacuation camps are only its 20% or so. Other 80% moved to their relatives in Fukushima Prefecture or Kanto district to stay together or stay at the rent-houses on their own expenses in Koriyama
and other nearby cities. Most of them have a sick member, aged member below 75, education concerns about their children or pets to keep.
By various reasons, or having some affordability, they had rented their own houses or apartments. They have to bear the utilities costs. They had to choose this means, because they cannot go and live in their own
houses. Nobody thinks they are living a gorgeous life. The people staying at a hotel or ryokan with US$50 daily supports have a much more gorgeous life.
The conditions and priorities set by the prefectural headquarters exclude most of refugees and save their budget by focusing on the limited groups of people. Priorities to weak people are quite reasonable, but if the system excludes most average people, is it a real relief system?
A theory is being argued recently that those in the evacuation camp would get the redress equivalent to the amount for accommodation which those staying at a hotel are paid. If so, it causes the biggest unfairness to those who moved to private rent-houses or apartments on their own expenses. Renting of an own apartment was a mistake?

3. Concerns ahead

The snow and the climate thaw even in the Tohoku district as May approaches. Shivering coldness is decreasing in the Big Palette, too. Colds, flues and norovirus may be over, but instead, as the tsuyu, rainy season, approaches, new concerns will arise, e.g., food poison or contagious diseases. It is a hard season of a year for refugees under stresses and with lost appetites and strengths.
As the evacuation life is prolonged, our houses are also a big concern. The backsides of the houses (in the shade) are easy to get moldy in tsuyu every year. The houses were especially closed tight upon evacuation. No good ventilation is likely. Most houses damaged by the
earthquakes lost their roof tiles. Those houses will decay due to rain leaks. Typhoons in autumn will be a big concern.
Weeds will cover the gardens. Rice pads and fields will go quickly back to the wild, unless properly farmed. Living environments can be maintained only by constant maintenance. If it is abandoned, the living environments will become miserable in half a year. People’s concerns are endless.






Last updated  2012.03.07 11:58:49
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1. Why can we stand the evacuation life full of hardships?

Many families remain in the Big Palette by being compromised with the environment. One family opted to stay here, after the family was awarded with a rent-house right by the prefectural headquarters and made a preliminary visit to an apartment. The apartment was not bad. It has
three rooms as well as a dining kitchen on the second floor of a concrete building near the Koriyama Station, not bad.
The reason of their choice was that the area was full of pubs or bars
for one, and for the second their children (primary and junior high schools) preferred remaining in the environment close to their school mates in Tomioka-cho staying in the Big Palette. Further,
the words the wife dropped off may show the reality.
- We have to pay for the utilities (electricity, water, gas),
and for other expenditures for meals, etc.
- In other words, nothing costs if we stay in the Big Palette.
They have to be prepared for the education costs for the children. The husband decided to leave temporarily the Big Palette alone for work. The wife cannot do a side job at home as before but instead got US$4,500 of donation and US$10,000 of advance compensation.
Donation and compensation will follow further. They can be saved for future. Such amount of saving was not practical before. The living environment in the Big Palette is being improved one after another: Washing machines and dryers are installed, no more costs for coin laundries; Sleeping conditions are comfortable on mattresses; the living space made of papers and cloths is more comfortable than anticipated with no dusts and external eye sights; Sufficient time for chatting with friends over free coffees and teas, etc. No costs for TV and newspapers, frequent catering service by volunteers are continuing for varieties of hot dishes; gyudon, udon, waffles, miso soup, etc.
Living knowhow in the Big Palette is already in hand and the bodies got accustomed to this environment. Being very unlikely to return home before the end of the year, we are prepared for a long life in the Big Palette.






Last updated  2012.03.07 11:52:47
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2012.02.29
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1. Living space improved in the Big Palette

The Annex Building has significantly changed its inside for better living
environment of refugees: Three rows of partitions separated by a corridor in
between. The new partitions are built by paper-made pillars and cloth walls. All
external eyesight is blocked. The open roof keeps the inside bright by the ceiling lights.
The paper-partitioned structure is very Japanese. A volunteer paper architect designed it and volunteer students built the “houses.” The floor inside is covered by mattresses. A family nameplate is put on each partition wall and shows who lives inside. It looks as though we walk through a corridor of a primary school.
Each family’s privacy is much better secured than before. Cloth walls have sound shielding effects, too. If a power source is available, it will be fairly
comfortable as a living space. The space will be acceptable, as a kind of studio flat for a four-member family. Clothing can be hung from the beam frames.
Families in the wall side partitions are even more fortunate. They can lean or
hang their clothing on the wall. The environment is much better than the previous ones, more appropriate for a prolonged evacuation life. After some families moved to this annex, the space in the main building can be shared by less people. The number of “residents” on the pathways decreased and the pathways could be a bit broadened.

2. Rent houses not popular

About 700 applications were received for rent houses as of April 22. But only about 100 families could have found a good one and moved out, according to a person in charge at the town headquarters. A priority goes to a family with an aged member or a member under nursing care.
The budget is secured for 1,500 families, but … Properties available in the market are limited: March/April is a high season for people’s migration, especially those in the private industry; good number of properties in Koriyama was also damaged by the earthquakes and needs repair work before rent.
Primary and junior high schools started their new semesters in April. It is not practical to change the school for the children just after they started new lives. To avoid the change, their families have to find a rent house near the Big Palette. Houses for those families should have been reserved in March by all means.
They have to stay here for the months to come for their children, unless appropriate rent houses can be found for them near the Big Palette. Families with a pet have an extreme difficulty. Appropriate properties for them are quite limited in Koriyama.

3. First meal from a convenience shop

A box meal was delivered for the first time after one month. At the moment, the meal is only for the evening, but the balance in nutrition is a bit improved. It took more than one month since we filed our complaints about imbalance of nutrition. The meal is still cold with no microwave oven at hand, but the people must have wondered how we could have survived one month with
simple omusubi meals.
Evacuation camps for a good number of people for an extended duration like the Big Palette should be well equipped with adequate catering and dining facilities staffed for cooking balanced hot meals as at schools or on cruisers. But it may be impractical due to limited space.






Last updated  2012.02.29 18:14:57
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1. Information wanted

How is our town going? It is the concern of everybody here. Our mayor’s office in the provisional town building in Koriyama has a big photo on its wall. The photo is a popular cherry flower avenue in the town with full bloom
but no people or traffic lights. The same photo hangs on the corridor wall in the Big Palette. It looks very unusual.
A lot of people, a lot of tourists must be there. The radiation level in the town is another concern. The data in Tomioka-cho or Okuma-cho are rarely made known to the public in comparison with other neighbor towns and villages. The level in the NPP surrounding towns was made public yesterday as 20μSv/hr.
It is still fairly high as compared with the level of 4μSv/hr in I-idate-mura, an evacuation warning zone. In-air radiation level is not the only one; the in-soil radiation level is equally a concern. Are they decreasing? Are they still increasing? Can we grow vegetables in our garden upon return?
How are they harmful to our health? No information comes to us. How will be the levels when our return can get green lights in six-months or one-year time? What should we and how can we prepare for our living back there upon return? What health risks do we foresee? The information the people want to know most is not given.

2. Controlled access

Upon re-designation of the town as the controlled access zone, the people are completely isolated from their own houses and other assets until the control is terminated. If the rule is violated, it becomes a “crime.” The reaction of the people is really big. People had a strong interest in the “short-visit” plan of the government.
Today’s announcement by the cabinet secretary Edano greatly disappointed the people: limited time, one per family, and by bus transport. Little possibility to bring things back, and to repair damaged houses. The distance to the home town has been lengthened to “Very far.”
The TEPCO plan for accidents termination ensured that we have no possibility to return home by the end of this year, and the effected access control cut practically our home visit possibilities. People here had an advantage to access the town in two hours by car, much shorter in time than the people who
moved far to Niigata-ken in the north or Saitama-ken in the south.
This big advantage is being lost. The people’s wish to stay as close as to their home town may be weakened.






Last updated  2012.02.29 18:09:10
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1. Home return rush

Today Prime Minister Kan visited the Big Palette. Today many of us visited their houses in Tomioka, one of my friends, too. He told me later:
In Tomioka, many private cars were running. He did some temporary repair work on his house damaged by the earthquake and brought back nine packs of rice. The Tomioka-cho is re-designated as a caution zone instead of an evacuation zone, and as of midnight today the access to the point within 20km comes under control.
Till today, main roads to the town were gated at their main points, but the gates were half-open and the policeman on duty let us go in, if we asked him, “Let us take back personal belongings just a minute.” Frequent visitors, first-time visitors, many people made today their last minute visits to the
town, own houses, filling all the roads to Tomioka-cho and O-kuma-cho.
From tomorrow, “authorized” short visits take effect, but under conditions: transfer by coach, not much time for stay, only one from each family, etc. All we can do is limited to check the house conditions and take back limited amount of personal belongings. Most houses of Japanese style lost their roof tiles
due to the earthquakes and covered by blue sheets for protection. But they are very likely to be damaged due to rain leaks in the rainy season to come in a month or two.
Nothing can be done in a limited time of short home visits. Pet owners, who
had left them behind, returned home once or twice earlier for feeding, but now have no choice other than taking them back, unless they can desert them.
Diary farmers, who own cows, are miserable. If today is the last day for feeding, all the cows will certainly die shortly. Couldn’t it be possible that the National Self-Defense Force, for instance, feed them regularly? It is strange that nothing can be heard from the animal protection groups, who cry out against killing whales or dolphins

2. Job seeking or not?

Most refugees had a job, except aged people and children. They lost their jobs when the area was designated as an evacuation zone. In the Big Palette, many “Want ads” are on the message board, but most of them are from other prefectures. People have to leave their hometowns in Fukushima, if they take the option.
Town office decided to recruit some staff, but the number is quite limited. People can survive here in the Big Palette, as long as they compromise with free
frugal meals of bread, omusubi and volunteer catering services, and free accommodation. It may be easier to stay here, rather than working with stresses.
Farmers and shopkeepers may get compensation for lost incomes by showing their past turnout results, but part-time workers may have a problem.

3. How the compensation will be paid?

I contacted the TEPCO customer service center in Tokyo on April 18 and requested to send by post the application forms and the instructions for compensation (US$10,000 per family). Nothing arrived so far. I contacted the center again and learned the delivery would be around April 27.
Ten days for s simple delivery only?! Concerns develop for the future smooth process! The center claims that the center simply forwards the applicant’s information to the corporate headquarters for further processing. At the camp, the Big Palette, the application forms are distributed two days ago.
The processing here may proceed earlier. One of my friends also made his application on the telephone, and got nothing, too. The people at the camp are a minority among the refugees. Delayed processing of the applications by phone is a problem. My hope to get compensation by the end of month may be unlikely.
A bigger problem is the application by the people in the “indoor sheltering” zone. They can apply for compensation by phone, but the application forms are halted at the post office. The post office even does not inform the recipients that the forms are ready for pick-up. The people have to visit the post office often, sometimes for nothing.
And the people are in the “indoor sheltering” zone. This is a headache for those who keep themselves from going out. Tokyo people can’t imagine even such a thing.






Last updated  2012.02.29 18:04:51
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1. Advance compensation payment

The application process for the advance compensation was started by TEPCO in Hall C. The Hall also accommodates the reception for the application for donation, a branch of the prefecture emergency headquarters and the bar association’s office for free legal consultation. The applications for the donation are processed smoothly and the waiting queue is not very long.
The applicants filled the application form in advance. To the contrary, tens of people are seated before the reception for the application for the advance compensation. Today is the first day of explanation and form distribution.
The team of TEPCO employees is seated in suits style in front in a row. After the apology message of the team leader, explanations start for each applicant.
Their suits style looks a kind of strange in the evacuation camp. They might have wanted to be polite to the people in a feeling of apology. But, their
top managers were in working suits in interview. Their managers visiting our mayor were also in working suits. Working suits will fit better while the
fight to terminate the accidents is still underway.
Their suits style looks a bit strange in this atmosphere. Some complaints were heard at the opening from among the applicants about delayed payment. But the process went smooth: US$10,000 for each family and US$7,500 for a single.
Some dissatisfaction among recipients: Singles get too much (US$7,500) as compared with families; Unfair that some families get US$17,500 simply because its one member living together is registered as a separate family. Such sort of complaints may come further with time.

2. Evacuation is not compulsory, no penalty “Scheduled” evacuation is provoking.

A question and answer when Deputy-cabinet secretary explained it to the people of I-idate-mura:
Q; I will NOT evacuate? Will I have a penalty?
A; No, you will be not.Q; Thank you, my question is finished.
This explains well how the people on evacuation think. The people in the Big Palette are concerned about the report that the “evacuation zone” (our home town Tomioka-cho included) would be re-designated as a “caution zone.” People think:
? I have to visit once again (Unauthorized visitors who fetched belongings or fed the dogs),
? I have to visit the town once as early as possible before it takes effect (First time visitors).
A possibility of authorized short visit is being explored, but nothing becomes clear. This is another frustrating element to the people.
3. Volunteer TV-talents and media More or less, TV news is coming back to the routine programs as the days before the disasters. Commercial channels are more so than NHK. Reports on restoration are increasing.
TV-talents,professional athletes and other celebrities are often highlighted in the reports. They show up in outdoor catering activities, sport exercises, etc. Some refugees present look merry with those stars and give a pleasant comment, “Very encouraged,” etc. It is obvious that the media manipulates the story for their report. That makes me embittered.

4. Our town can survive?

Three towns (Tomioka, O-kuma, Futaba) and one village (Kawauchi) in the evacuation zone moved their offices to different locations. My hometown Tomioka-cho has only 1,500 people together at the Big Palette, out of 15,000. All others are scattered. This gives the office a lot of difficulties in administering the town as a unit.
People are willing to keep their registration in town for the compensation issue. Everybody of the town (Mayor, town staff, people) wants to keep solidarity as a unity, hoping to return home some day. But in the prolonged evacuation life with no specific time horizon foreseen for it, some may find a job or buy a house in the camp area.
The mindset as a town member may gradually decay. Some families may prefer moving to a new place for their children’s high schools or universities. The town may lose its people. Only the house owners and the land owners may be left. It cuts the town revenue and jeopardizes the town itself. If people cannot
return home for years ahead, even in part of the town, can the town survive?






Last updated  2012.02.29 15:21:27
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1. Nursing cares

Volunteer nurses for mental care visited us today. They walked around us with their identification tags. They were not very proactively talking to us. Aged people are apt to become demented in such a monotonous life. Shocks by the earthquakes and subsequent evacuation life may increase the risk of dementia. Caretakers should be proactive in talking to them. Some aged people are occasionally seen, leaning on the wall, eating omusumi.
They look somewhere far, absent-minded. Such people are recently increasing. Some people are watching TV programs, but not so many, not in a larger group as before. The town office has a list of all of us. They can identify who needs care. They should organize a working system of doctors, nurses, care managers and caretakers for better quality cares.
Dedicated space and staff for day-care service are also needed in the building.
Children also need cares to check, if they get used to a new environment at a new school.

2. Review once, please

After one month of evacuation life at the Big Palette, everybody knows by now that the evacuation life will last months ahead. It is the time to review the environment --- hygienic and health conditions or mental conditions of evacuees ---, and tune up the system for an extended evacuation life ahead.
TV news tells us of an atmosphere of gradual restoration in the quake hit areas: body search projects; clearance of rubbles and wreckage; new town planning; restoration of industries, etc.
The people here, however, cannot stand even at the start line yet. Limited number of the dead and the missing, limited damage of the tsunami, but nevertheless they are “contained” in the evacuation camp for months ahead. How stressful is it to the people? Psychiatrists should analyze it for appropriate cares. Those staying in a hotel or ryokan may have no big issues in life,
but similar to the birds in a cage.

3. Even if we could return home, …

The TEPCO plan for accident termination foresees many items of work in six to nine months ahead. When completed, the reactors are in cold-standby and no more release of radioactive materials to the outside land and ocean. People long for that situation as early as possible, because this is the primary condition for them to return home. The mayor expressed to the press his wish to advance the schedule, while he values the termination plan.
Fukushima Daiichi stands in our next town Okuma-cho. In the Tomioka-cho people’s mind, the NPPs there may not be so close to us as to the people in Okuma-cho, but those NPPs damaged and to be decommissioned are next door to us. Many of us were working there. Even more, Fukushima Daini stands in our own town Tomioka-cho. If TEPCO continues to operate the NPPs at Fukushima Daini, what safety measures TEPCO is going to take? Are they trustworthy?
Where is TEPCO itself going? Tomioka-cho people get a big issue to think how to coexist with NPPs. Affirmatives and negatives may get fierce in discussing the matter. Time to argue the Yes/No concerning site locations may come back again.






Last updated  2012.02.29 15:14:49
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1. Who is willing to spend his/her own money?!

Donations and compensation money are being provided soon. The people of the Big Palette look forward to receiving them. Workers of medium and small local firms, shopkeepers, part-time workers, they lost all income sources in March and April, and even longer unless a job can be found here. Some of double-income couples have lost both sources. Some people might have dipped into their savings. Nobody here is willing to use their own money.
Some are in a difficulty for the redemption of the house loan, for instance the big firm employees or aged pensioners. Nobody is certain what compensation money will be paid, and what future life waits ahead for them. Everybody wants to cut their daily expenditures. We are not happy with simple meals repeated with bread or omusubi, but that does not mean anybody of us dine out on their own money.
A kind of discrimination feeling also exists among the people here. Those who could go to a hotel or ryokan for stay get US$50 daily and enjoy their life. On
the contrary, we here … Certainly we have to pay for food and utilities, but the life here is not what we were willing to live. I don’t want to spend even a penny of my own.

2. Free legal advice

The Fukushima Bar Association operates an ad-hoc office in the Big Palette for free legal advice. Not many visitors, though. The consultants have not much to do, so it seems. According to them, consultations are mostly concerned with compensation. The biggest interest is what will be compensated, especially
whether the houses and the land in Tomioka-cho would be
compensated.
- Will TEPCO or the government buy the house and the land?
- Are we compensated for the loss? Their price is far down after the accident. We lose a lot even if we want to sell them and move to other settlement.
- Even if we decide to return, their values to succeed by children drops. Is it compensated?
- We can’t live in our newly built house. Our financial and mental burden is compensated?
- What about the mental fears against radiation and the stresses of evacuation life?
But these are what the lawyers cannot give specific and clear advice. One difficulty will be how the value reduction can be assessed based on what?
A lawyer pointed that the amount of damage cannot be fixed until all issues can be made clear. If so, it will take years before we can submit our request of compensation.
A current concern is that some money is automatically debited from the bank account. The lawyer’s advice was: Leave zero in the account, because the payment of disaster victims is authorized to delay.

3. Schedule follow-up chart, please TEPCO issued yesterday a blue print of accident termination schedules. Now we can have an image of time horizon for future.
The important thing from now is to follow the development and record the progress on the chart. By doing so, everybody can grasp the current situation and take necessary actions to meet the schedule. An example is a meal issue of the Big Palette. No significant improvement is being done in our one-month evacuation life. If the improvement plan is shown on a chart and followed
constantly, it would be done sooner or later before long.
This helps us foreseeing the improvement and calming down our frustration.






Last updated  2012.02.29 15:10:44
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1. Who is willing to spend his/her own money?!

Donations and compensation money are being provided soon. The people of the Big Palette look forward to receiving them. Workers of medium and small local firms, shopkeepers,part-time workers, they lost all income sources in March and April, and even longer unless a job can be found here. Some of double-income couples have lost both sources. Some people might have dipped into their savings. Nobody here is willing to use their own money.
Some are in a difficulty for the redemption of the house loan, for instance the big firm employees or aged pensioners. Nobody is certain what compensation money will be paid, and what future life waits ahead for them. Everybody wants to cut their daily expenditures. We are not happy with simple meals repeated with bread or omusubi, but that does not mean anybody of us dine out on their own money.
A kind of discrimination feeling also exists among the people here. Those who could go to a hotel or ryokan for stay get US$50 daily and enjoy their life. On
the contrary, we here … Certainly we have to pay for food and utilities, but the life here is not what we were willing to live. I don’t want to spend even a penny of my own.

2. Free legal advice

The Fukushima Bar Association operates an ad-hoc office in the Big Palette for free legal advice. Not many visitors, though. The consultants have not much to do, so it seems. According to them, consultations are mostly concerned with compensation. The biggest interest is what will be compensated, especially
whether the houses and the land in Tomioka-cho would be compensated.
- Will TEPCO or the government buy the house and the land?
- Are we compensated for the loss? Their price is far down after the accident.
We lose a lot even if we want to sell them and move to other settlement.
- Even if we decide to return, their values to succeed by children drops. Is it compensated?
- We can’t live in our newly built house. Our financial and mental burden is compensated?
- What about the mental fears against radiation and the stresses of evacuation life?
But these are what the lawyers cannot give specific and clear advice. One difficulty will be how the value reduction can be assessed based on what?
A lawyer pointed that the amount of damage cannot be fixed until all issues can be made clear. If so, it will take years before we can submit our request of compensation. A current concern is that some money is automatically debited from the bank account.
The lawyer’s advice was: Leave zero in the account, because the payment of disaster victims is authorized to delay.3. Schedule follow-up chart, please
TEPCO issued yesterday a blue print of accident termination schedules. Now we can have an image of time horizon for future.
The important thing from now is to follow the development and record the progress on the chart. By doing so, everybody can grasp the current situation and take necessary actions to meet the schedule. An example is a meal issue of the Big Palette. No significant improvement is being done in our one-month evacuation life. If the improvement plan is shown on a chart and followed
constantly, it would be done sooner or later before long. This helps us foreseeing the improvement and calming down our frustration.






Last updated  2012.02.29 14:15:33
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